MultiCriteria Fire Detection Devices: A New Age Of Fire Safety

Fire is a deadly element but an array of detection technologies have helped us control the use of fire to benefit our everyday lives. We are now capable of reducing the threat fire can bring to us and our property. This article will inform you about the latest fire safety innovations that help keep our property and lives away from the dangers of fire hazards.

Early warning smoke detection systems have contributed the most to improve fire safety measures. These detection system have saved over 90,000 lives over the past 40 years. They have also averted potential tragedies simply from their ability to alert people early of potential fire hazards.

In fact, a working smoke alarm detector can reduce the odds of dying in a house by 50 percent.

Combined with fire sprinkler systems, smoke detectors are one of the best ways contractors can protect people and property.

Another beneficial fire detection technology is smart technology. This technology is composed of multi-criteria fire detection devices made to enhance the simplicity and reliability of fire systems. One of the latest innovations in smart fire detection technology is advanced signal analysis software. This analysis software helps convert sensor signals into mathematical formulas to differentiate a real fire emergency from harmless smoke that results from a welder, steam or dust.

This technology can monitor air with its ultra-sensitive air sampling smoke detection capabilities to determine if, when and what type of response is needed to alert building occupants of danger.

One sophisticated smoke detector can cover up to 20,000 square feet to provide Very Early Warning Fire Detection (VEWFD). This is an excellent fire safety device to have especially for telecommunication facilities, data centers and other high value properties.

This advancement in fire detection has made it easier for building occupants to detect smoke, heat, CO, and ion with multi-criteria fire detectors.

Last but least, the integration of gas detection into smoke detection systems is beginning a new, advance, improved age of fire safety. By smoke detectors combining gas detection with heat and smoke sensors, more false alarms can be avoided and allow multi-criteria detection systems to better analyze any given fire situation. This makes it possible, for example, to detect whether heat alone is rising and if CO or other gases from combustion are present.

Fireline’s professional staff provides design, installation, programming and training of automatic detection and fire alarm systems to protect a wide variety of standard and special hazards systems. All system designs are reviewed by NICET (National Institute for Certification in Engineering Technologies) certified technicians, a recognized standard of excellence. In addition, all field personnel are factory trained on the products well sell. This ensures the very best service for our customers, from project concept to acceptance testing. In fact, in 2009, Fireline was recognized as Notifier’s Distributor of the Year.

Review Fireline’s latest fire alarm systems here.

Fireline is a Maryland corporation founded in 1947 by John S. Waters. Fireline remains a pioneer in the fledgling fire equipment distribution business and we have grown to encompass all facets of fire protection. Our Totally Integrated Protection Solutions provide you with a wide variety of services. We can design, install, inspect, or service any type of fire protection system. From fire alarm to fire extinguisher, we do it all!

If you have any questions about Fire Alarm Systems,Dry Chemical Fire Extinguisher and Wet Chemical Fire Extinguishers,Sprinklers, fire equipment, or other Fireline products and services, contact Fireline by calling 410.247.1422 or click here today!

Source: http://www.campussafetymagazine.com/Channel/Security-Technology/Articles/2012/05/Advances-Spark-New-Age-of-Fire-Safety.aspx

This entry was posted on Wednesday, June 20th, 2012 at 1:02 pm. Both comments and pings are currently closed.

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