Holiday Cooking Fire Safety Tips

November 20th, 2014

Holiday Cooking Fires

With Thanksgiving knocking on our doorsteps, the holiday season is right around the corner for everyone. The holiday season means holiday parties, holiday shopping, and plenty of holiday cooking. With so much time being spent in the kitchen, homes are at a higher risk for cooking fires. Here are some tips on how to avoid a holiday cooking fire in your kitchen.

  1. Keep children out of the kitchen when holiday cooking is taking place. Children can easily cause spills, which could lead to a holiday cooking fire.
  2. When working around an open flame or heated surface, remove any paper or plastic materials from the area.
  3. When grilling, frying, or boiling food, never leave the stove unattended. You are working with flammable grease and oil at high temperatures, making the situation vulnerable to a holiday cooking fire. Should you need to leave the kitchen, turn off the stove or ask a family member to watch the stove.
  4. Be aware of foods left to boil or simmer on your stovetop. While these items are a tad safer to leave unattended, it’s important to monitor your food while setting a timer to avoid burns.
  5. Never wear long sleeves while cooking over an open flame. Clothing can easily catch flame, causing an unwanted and dangerous holiday cooking fire.
  6. Should a fire occur on your stovetop, turn off the heat source if you can do so safely. Then slide a lid over your pan or pot to smother the flames. Never try to remove the pot or pan from the stove while flames or smoke are visible.
  7. Should an oven fire occur, keep the door to the oven closed and turn off the heat source if you can do so safely.
  8. Should a holiday cooking fire occur, call your local fire department immediately. Ensure that all family members and friends know safe ways to leave your home should a fire occur.

When a holiday cooking fire is possible, your home should have a portable fire extinguisher on hand at all times. A Class K extinguisher is best used in scenarios involving flammable cooking materials such as grease or oil.

At Fireline, we offer an array of portable fire extinguishers and fire alarm systems to keep your family and friends safe this holiday season. Fireline offers the highest quality alarm systems to keep your home and business safe from fires and carbon monoxide poisoning.

To get started with Fireline today, call us at 1-800-553-3405, or visit our contact page.

Be sure to “Like” and “Follow” the official Fireline page today on Google+, Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn.

Source:

http://goo.gl/nvgf4S

Fire Sprinkler System Myths

November 20th, 2014

Fire Sprinkler System Myths

When it comes to fire safety for a building, no precaution is ever too much. From installing smoke alarms to having exit routes planned to even holding practice fire drills for occupants, there is never overkill when it comes to protecting occupants from a fire. For this reason, all buildings should consider installing a fire sprinkler system. A fire sprinkler system will help control a building fire and give occupants time to exit the building safely. However, many landlords are not open to the idea of installing a fire sprinkler system because of myths they have in their head. Fireline is here to tell you that those myths are not true and that a fire sprinkler system is what your building needs in fire safety protection.

  1. Myth- A smoke alarm is enough. A smoke alarm is useful for detecting a fire within your building, but it does nothing in the way of control of the fire. You need a fire sprinkler system that will not only detect the fire within your building, but help control the flames while your occupants leave the building safely.
  2. Myth-If one sprinkler reacts, all of the sprinklers react. Each sprinkler within a system is activated on an individual basis. The sprinkler that is closest to the flame will be activated, but a sprinkler located in a room across the building will not.
  3. Myth- The sprinklers will only freeze once the weather grows cold. Areas that experience freezing temperatures have procedures in place during the installation process that will prevent your sprinkler system from freezing.
  4. Myth- My fire sprinkler system will leak often. Your commercial plumbing system has a better chance of leaking than your sprinkler system.
  5. Myth- The damage caused by the water will be worse than the damage caused by the fire. At most, 26 gallons of water is released from a sprinkler per minute once activated. A fire can consume a building in about 9 minutes, causing irreversible damage. This isn’t even including the damage caused by the smoke alone.

 

At Fireline, we offer a number of different sprinkler systems to keep families and businesses safe. Fireline offers the highest quality alarm and sprinkler systems to keep your home and business safe from fires and carbon monoxide poisoning.

To get started with Fireline today, call us at 1-800-553-3405, or visit our contact page.

Be sure to “Like” and “Follow” the official Fireline page today on Google+, Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn.

Source:

http://www.homefiresprinkler.org/fire-sprinkler-myths

Carbon Monoxide Poisoning Protection

November 5th, 2014

Carbon Monoxide Poisoning

Carbon monoxide poisoning is one of the leading causes of accidental residential deaths. Every year, anywhere from 170 to 400 lives are lost in the United States due to carbon monoxide poisoning. Carbon monoxide poisoning is also known as the “silent killer” because the gas is odorless, colorless, and tasteless, making it difficult to detect. Carbon monoxide occurs when different fuels are burned incompletely.

Burning fuels that can lead to the release of carbon monoxide include:

  1. Natural gas
  2. Coal
  3. Kerosene
  4. Wood
  5. Oil
  6. Propane
  7. Charcoal

When carbon monoxide poisoning occurs, CO is replacing and then blocking the amount of oxygen available to the blood. When this occurs, your tissues become damaged, and too much damage can then result in death. While detecting carbon monoxide is near impossible without some type of alarm system, there are symptoms that warn you are experiencing carbon monoxide poisoning. Symptoms to be aware of are:

  1. Confusion
  2. Headache
  3. Shortness of breath
  4. Fatigue
  5. Nausea
  6. Vomiting

As the carbon monoxide poisoning progresses, you will experience loss of consciousness along with loss of your muscular functions. At this point, fatality is imminent if medical attention isn’t available immediately.

There are several ways for homeowners to prevent carbon monoxide poisoning, especially as the weather grows colder.

  1. If the need ever arises for you to burn the previously mentioned fuels, ventilation is imperative.
  2. Have your appliances and HVAC systems maintained and checked by professionals to ensure they are working properly.
  3. Charcoal should only be burned outside. Never burn charcoal inside a home, tent, garage, or vehicle.
  4. Never leave your car running inside a garage with the door closed.
  5. Gas appliances should never be used to heat your home. These appliances include ovens, ranges, and clothes dryers.
  6. Be sure to install a CO alarm within your home. This will alert you should dangerous levels of carbon monoxide be detected in your home.

 

At Fireline, we offer fire alarm systems that include air sampling systems. Fireline offers the highest quality alarm systems to keep your home and business safe from fires and carbon monoxide poisoning.

To get started with Fireline today, call us at 1-800-553-3405, or visit our contact page.

Be sure to “Like” and “Follow” the official Fireline page today on Google+, Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn.

Source:

http://goo.gl/k3929b

Winter Heating Safety Tips

October 21st, 2014

Winter Heating Safety

With the cold weather quickly moving into the Baltimore and Maryland region, residents throughout the state are beginning to use their heat sources for their home. While homeowners begin to use their space heaters, chimneys, and furnaces, some may fail to realize the increased risk of fire they are now under. According to the NFPA, residential fires increase tremendously during the colder months. There are several ways to avoid winter heating fires this season.

Avoiding Winter Heating Fires

  1. Remove any flammable materials from your heat source. Avoid placing any flammable materials near your furnace or chimney while they are being used.
  2. If you have children, remind them of the “kid free” area surrounding the heat source. While children may enjoy sitting close to the heat during colder evenings, they should know to stay away from the source to avoid being burned.
  3. Before using your furnace or chimney, have a professional visit your home for a cleaning and maintenance appointment. This will ensure that your heating source is in proper working order before use.
  4. If your home currently lacks a heating source, discuss your options with a professional. Some heating sources are not compatible with every residential setting.
  5. Never use your oven as a heat source for your home. While an oven may cause heat in your home while being used, it should never be used as the main source of residential heat.
  6. When using space heaters, be sure to use the proper fuel for the appliance. Using the wrong fuel could lead to overheating.
  7. Turn off space heaters when leaving a room or going to sleep. Space heaters should be used in a monitored setting.
  8. Have your fire alarm system installed and inspected by Fireline.

 

Winter Heating Safety with Fireline

Fireline has been providing Maryland with quality fire alarm systems since 1947. Our teams of technicians are trained to not only install your fire alarm systems, but maintain and repair the systems as well. We also offer the highest quality of heat detection, smoke detection, and flame detection systems as well. When it comes to winter heating safety, there is nothing safer than having a fire alarm system installed within your Maryland home.

 

To get started with Fireline today, call us at 1-800-553-3405, or visit our contact page.

Be sure to “Like” and “Follow” the official Fireline page today on Google+, Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn.

Source:

http://www.nfpa.org/safety-information/for-consumers/causes/heating/heating-safety-tips

Which Portable Fire Extinguisher Should I Use?

October 15th, 2014

Portable Fire Extinguisher

When it comes to using a portable fire extinguisher when handling a small, contained fire, it’s important to know which portable fire extinguisher to use. There are a number of different portable fire extinguisher options, but using the wrong type could lead to a more serious fire. Portable fire extinguishers remove one of the three elements of a fire, fuel, oxygen, and heat, in order to extinguish the flame.

Classes of Portable Fire Extinguisher

  • Water- This type of extinguisher removes the “heat” element from the burning surface, extinguishing the flame. A water extinguisher is also known as a Class A extinguisher and can be used for fires involving plastics, papers, wood, rubber, and cloth.
  • CO2- This type of extinguisher removes the oxygen element from the fire to extinguish the burning flame. Also known as a Class B, these extinguishers are to be used with flammable liquids such as solvents, gasoline, oil, grease, certain paints, and lacquers.
  • Dry Chemical- Also known as a Class C extinguisher, this type is meant for electrical fires. This includes small fires within computers, fuse boxes, and wiring.
  • Multipurpose- This type of extinguisher can be used on both A, B, and C fires.
  • Class D- There is several different extinguishers within this class to be used on specific types of metals. These extinguishers are normally found in factories that use metals such as sodium, titanium, magnesium, and potassium.
  • Class K- This type of extinguisher is meant for kitchen fires involving oils and grease.

When to Use your Portable Fire Extinguisher

Each portable fire extinguisher should only be used for its specific type of fire. Class A extinguishers could cause a Class B fire to spread or electrocution in a Class C fire. A Class B extinguisher could fail to completely extinguish a Class A fire, causing the flame to re-ignite later. A fire extinguisher should never be used on a fire that is spreading, or if the substance burning is unknown.

 

Fireline is a leader in the portable fire extinguisher industry. We offer several portable fire extinguishers as well as maintenance and other services regarding portable fire extinguishers. We highly recommend portable fire extinguisher training for all who have a risk of needing to use the device during the job.

To get started with Fireline today, call us at 1-800-553-3405, or visit our contact page.

Be sure to “Like” and “Follow” the official Fireline page today on Google+, Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn.

 

Source:

https://www.osha.gov/SLTC/etools/evacuation/portable_about.html

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